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20121201
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to indicate this or that person, then everything became political. and in italy when something becomes political, and controversial, politically speaking then the only thing that you can do is to leave. but 19 years are part of my best years in my musical career. so i said, you know, to explain exactly details what happened is impossible. and the newspapers generally made a mess of the entire story because they didn't know exactly the details. they thought that the orchestra was against me but this is not true. >> not true, absolutely not true. i never had a fight with an orchestra in my life. but there were reasons outside of the artistic field that created a situation and we couldn't kmup kate any more. we had completely different ideas. >> there was no one that could have made a difference? >> no, because we mentioned before this dictator, you know, in a very delicate way. but mussolini, one time said speaking about italy, the italians said one phrase that is memorable. one phrase was interesting. they said to control it, to govern the italians is not difficult. it is impossible so
the message, and this programs of sistema happens in los angeles, in scotland, in sweden, in korea, in italy, in germany, not only los angeles in the states but it is happening in a lot of programs inspired by sistema, it is only to help that, you know, to develop the idea of music as a human right. >> rose: yes. >> it is a -- well, like this guy is talking about something really crazy. but i think art has to be an element of society, to be better citizens, to be a better human beings, we are not talking about something new. wwe can go back, you know, in times, you know, when art was an element, an essential element of the men. and that is something that we need in this -- >> rose: it speaks to who we are and what we want to become. >> exactly. especially in in very cultivated world where -- >> rose: yeah. >> where we have to build something better, something more sensible for -- >> rose: when you accepted the job at the la philharmonic, why there? >> one of my first commitments was at los angeles, after i won the competition,. i remember invited me. >> rose: the then conductor. >> exactly.
to a countermovement of fast food. it started by out-of-work communists in italy the day they built a mcdonnel's on the spanish steps in rome. they came down to raise the flag against fast food. what it represents is that as we move forward into the future ideology becomes second to philosophy and food is produceed in a way that more represents getting it to the market in the right shape as opposed to celebrating the odd appletor very geospecific peach that grows in eastern washington. so they're trying to say don't let our biodiversity shrink to make it more efficient. let's keep biodiversity as an important thing and help promulgate and keep these things going by supporting them, creating a market for them and helping to get to the place. so that's what slow food is. >> the fact that you're no longer in the kitchen much, that you're an entrepreneur, does that mean the restaurant is not really yours anymore? >> no, as alain ducass once told me, "i 'nam all the kitchens all the time." ducasse. and he's got more than me. >> rose: this is a guy who survived a plane crash, by the way. >> i
inowe way led an assault on machine guns in italy. he destroyed all three after being shot in the stomach and having his right arm nearly severed. it was later amputated. he was awarded the distinguished service cross but it was elevated to the medal of honor. his death live the michigan congressman as one of the two remaining world war ii veterans in congress. >> he worked to make the congress effective as a tool in serving the broad public interest both for hawaii and for the rest of the country. he believed in legislating, legislating well. he knew that working together and accepting the responsibilities that we get when we are sworn in and when weary lected was an extremely important part of his responsibility as senator. >> brown: after the war, he turned to politics. he won a seat in the u.s. house in 1959 and was elected senator in 1962. six years later as keynote speaker he lent a steady voice of reason to the riotous proceedings of the 1968 democratic convention in chicago. >> this is our country. and we are engaged in a time of great testing. >> brown: he became k
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5 (some duplicates have been removed)

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